White paper

Electromagnetic interference simulation in electric vehicles

Electric powertrains introduce wide-band, high-level electromagnetic interference (EMI) that can compromise susceptible electronic and radiofrequency units. High-voltage and high-current electrical systems add to the complexity of thermal issues. EMI, electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), and thermal assessments are critical to the engineering of vehicle electrical systems.

This white paper examines EMI/EMC and thermal challenges and the complexities they cause in overall vehicle electrical system engineering. It also describes how Siemens simulation solutions are enabling engineers to address them from the earliest prototyping stages.

An integrated modeling approach to analyze EMI/EMC issues

Electrical engineering must consider the electromagnetic and thermal issues at the component level and the full vehicle level. This paper describes how multi-physics, multi-domain, high-fidelity simulation can help overcome the key technical challenges.

Investigating system EMI EMC challenges and connector thermal design

Powertrain electrification and autonomy have significantly increased the complexity of vehicle electrical power and electronics architectures. The high-power levels in electric cars and high-power charging at high currents generate strong electromagnetic fields and high heat losses that can threaten the safe and reliable operation of electronic components and signal lines used for autonomous driving, V2X connectivity, and other systems. It is essential for electrical engineering to use multi-physics simulation to assess EMC/EMI and thermal performance at the component, system/subsystem, and full-vehicle levels.

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Electric powertrains introduce wide-band, high-level electromagnetic interference (EMI) that can compromise susceptible electronic and radiofrequency units. High-voltage and high-current electrical systems add to the complexity of thermal issues. EMI, electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), and thermal assessments are critical to the engineering of vehicle electrical systems.

This white paper examines EMI/EMC and thermal challenges and the complexities they cause in overall vehicle electrical system engineering. It also describes how Siemens simulation solutions are enabling engineers to address them from the earliest prototyping stages.

An integrated modeling approach to analyze EMI/EMC issues

Electrical engineering must consider the electromagnetic and thermal issues at the component level and the full vehicle level. This paper describes how multi-physics, multi-domain, high-fidelity simulation can help overcome the key technical challenges.

Investigating system EMI EMC challenges and connector thermal design

Powertrain electrification and autonomy have significantly increased the complexity of vehicle electrical power and electronics architectures. The high-power levels in electric cars and high-power charging at high currents generate strong electromagnetic fields and high heat losses that can threaten the safe and reliable operation of electronic components and signal lines used for autonomous driving, V2X connectivity, and other systems. It is essential for electrical engineering to use multi-physics simulation to assess EMC/EMI and thermal performance at the component, system/subsystem, and full-vehicle levels.